California Xi Chapter - California State University, Chico


The California Xi Chapter at California State University, Chico was originally colonized on campus in December of 1987. On April 16, 1988 California Xi became the 205th chapter of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity and the 14th chapter in the state of California. Despite prominent beginnings, the chapter was suspended by the General Council in October of 1996 for failing financial operations. After being reorganized by an interest group in the fall of 1999, California was recolonized on March 6, 2000 and reinstated as a chapter on May 13, 2000. To date, the California Xi Chapter has initiated 400 members.




Founding of California Xi as reported in the Scroll, Volume 112, No.1 (Winter, '88-'89)

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CHARTER: Brothers at California Xi proudly display their new charter following installation ceremonies

California Xi Installed at Chico

The California Xi Chapter at California State University-Chico was installed on April 16 with a rich history of 28 years behind it as a chapter of Delta Sigma Pi, a professional business fraternity.

"Proud to be a Phi Delt!"

This was the reply given by Garth Falk, Spring '88 president of the California Xi Chapter of Phi Delta Theta, when asked about his thoughts concerning the chapter installation on April 16. During the following reception, it was evident that the California Xi Chapter carries with it a long and treasured history.

The California Xi Chapter has acquired a wealth of tradition and history spanning some 28 years. On December 3, 1960 the Epsilon Theta Chapter was installed into Delta Sigma Pi, a professional business fraternity.

The Epsilon Theta Chapter placed great value upon the camaraderie of men, or what we commonly refer to as fraternal brotherhood. This was due to the fact that, at its founding, the Epsilon Theta Chapter had a substantial number of brothers who were active members of general fraternities at Chico State; dual membership is allowed in both general and professional fraternities.

From its conception, the Epsilon Theta Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi sought to bring together the best from both worlds. Some members emphasized the professional nature of the organization. Others worked to develop those all important fraternal qualities, which are the backbone of a strong and lasting brotherhood. From that point in time until the spring semester of 1986, the Epsilon Theta Chapter placed special significance upon the values associated with traditional fraternities, while at the same time underscoring the importance of academic and career development.

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CHARTER PRESENTATION: GC President C.T. Bray hands Garth Falk, chapter president, the charter for the newly installed California Xi chapter.

In 1972 the fraternal bonds which existed within professional fraternities were changed by the addition of TITLE IX to the education code. The passage of TITLE IX into law made it illegal for professional fraternities, among them Delta Sigma Pi, to restrict membership on the basis of sex.

For over 15 years the Epsilon Theta Chapter was able to withstand the pressure from all outside forces to admit women. However, during the fall 1986 semester the chapter was issued an ultimatum by the campus administration to either obtain, "a critical mass of active female members" or the organization would lose official unversity sanction.

This co-ed issue, was the cause of irreconcilable differences within the Epsilon Theta Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi. Twenty-seven active members, a majority of the 48-man chapter, foresaw disasterous effects upon the chapter's brotherhood. They sought to associate with another fraternity, one which was exempt from TITLE IX.

At that time, the Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC) and the campus administration were adamently opposed to fraternity expansion. They believed that the competition among fraternities for membership and housing was so intense, a new organization could not survive. Believing that it was not possible to form a new fraternity, because it was thought that campus and IFC recognition would not forthcoming, the Cal-Iota Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon was approached with a proposed merger. At that point, the Cal-Iota Chapter was in desperate need of membership. Our newgoal was to immediately acquire national support and the Cal-Iota chapter house, which was rather large and wholly owned by the Housing Corporation.

The merger failed because the nine active members of Sigma Phi Epsilon shortly began to understand how fundamentally their chapter would change. Nevertheless, because of differing philosophies and goals for the chapter, negotiations failed, and shortly afterward so did the California Iota Chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon.

When negotiations fell through, many within our group were absolutely devastated. We each, as individuals, had to decide our own future. Most of us considered the following three options: to disassociate one's self completely from fraternity entanglements; to return to Delta Sigma Pi, or to seize the challenge and somehow forge a new fraternity at Chico State, as 15 of us did.

On Feb. 11, 1987 Alpha Sigma Omega, a local fraternity, was founded. This new organization provided our group with a fraternal identity and a vehicle through which to perpetuate our brotherhood. During this time, our group conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the top 13 general fraternities desiring chapters at Chico State.

Unyielding drive, incredible desire, and thorough knowledge were the cornerstones of our successful organization. Many on campus were astounded by the way Alpha Sigma Omega seemed to come from no where. In only one semester we had incredible success; we managed to lease a chapter house immediately upon formation of our organization. Possession of a house significantly added to our credibilty as a fraternity. We recruited 10 exceptional men to become pledges in our Spring 1987 Pledge Class. These men sacrificed much and contributed greatly to the prosperity of Alpha Sigma Omega. More importantly, the men of Alpha Sigma Omega represented a singlemindedness of purpose and possessed the skills necessary to work within the campus bureaucracy to achieve bothcampus and IFC recognition in only 48 school days, A feat unparralled by any other fraternity at Chico State sonce the founding of the local IFC some 19 years ago.

On Nov. 7, 1987 Robert F. Ingles, province president of Omicron North, made a presentation to the members of Alpha Sigma Omega. In this presentation Ingles illustrated the tangible benefits associated with membership in Phi Delta Theta. We were thoroughly impressed with Ingles, because of his obvious love and devoton for Phi Delta Theta. After careful deliberation on Nov. 17, 1987, we narrowed our selection to Sigma Chi and Phi Delta Theta. In a secret ballot that evening, after reviewing all available information, Phi Delta Theta was selected unanimously by the active body.

We achieved colony status shortly after petitioning the General Council. On Dec. 13, 1987 we were formally installed as the California Xi Colony of Phi Delta Theta. After a brief period as a colony, some 65 school days, we were inititated into, and became an active chapter of Phi Delta Theta. Initiation and installation was held at the Newman Center where 35 undergraduate and two alumni members were intitiated. Initiation of the alumni was particularly moving, because among them was Rupert McDowell ('73) who is an alumnus of the Epsilon Theta Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi and whose father is a Phi Delt.

Chartering was only possible within the time-frame because of the sheer desire of all of our members, united for this common goal. Our reward to came on April 16, 1988 when we received our charter from Brother Tal Bray, president of the General Council, Brother Robert Biggs, director of chapter services, and Brother Robert McInnes, chapter consultant.

The following members were initiated into the California Xi Chapter of Phi Delta Theta on April 15, 1988: Garth Falk, Edgar Hernandez, Edward Odasz, Jr., John Cunningham, Jr., James Jones, Edward Trumbull, Jeffrey Rhine, Christopher Aust, James Small, Steven Moe, Keith Aldrich, Viet Troung, William Dabney, Jr., Michael Dean, Scott Huntington, Howard Kanter, Sean McDaniel, David Mullarky, Arthur Chavez, David Haugen, Scott Copper, Darren Grove, Darren Kille, Steven Dutra, Reed Roberts, Brent Jolliff, Gerald Stevenson, Edward Click, Rodner Carr, William Gaul, Erik Feingold, Michael Hadden, Shawn Horan, Thomas Collier, Timothy McMullen, alumni Rupert McDowell, and alumni Jeffrey James.

The men on California Xi would like to thank our General Headquarters Staff, all the chapters of Omicron North for their many contributions to our chapter, and we would especially like to thank Brother Robert Ingles and Brother Pete Knight, for their participation in, and support of our chapter. Without which this would not have been possible.

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CALIFORNIA XI: The initiation team along with GC President C.T. Bray join the new initiates of California Xi following initiation ceremonies.

Re-founding of California Xi as reported in the Scroll, (Winter-Spring, 2000)


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General Headquarters Awards

Below is a full listing of all awards received by the California Xi Chapter from Phi Delta Theta General Headquarters:
Award
Year
Silver Star
1989
Community Service Citation
1989
Silver Star
1990
GHQ Trophy
1990
GHQ Trophy
1991
Community Service Citation
1991
Gold Star
1991
Silver Star
1992
GHQ Trophy
2004
Gold Star
2004
Community Service Citation
2004
Recruitment Recognition Award
2004
GHQ Trophy
2005
Community Service Citation
2005
Community Service Citation
2006
Biggers Ritual Trophy
2006
Gold Star
2006
Outstanding Recruitment Program*
2006
Biggers Ritual Trophy
2007
Community Service Citation
2007
Silver Star
2008
Biggers Ritual
2008
Community Service Citation
2008
Outstanding Recruitment Program*
2009
Excellence in Risk Management*
2009
GHQ Trophy
2009
Community Service Citation
2009
Recruitment Recognition
2009
*Major award generally only given to one chapter in all of Phi Delta Theta each year




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